Category Archives: History Lesson

My 2011 year in review

Well, it’s been a long time coming since my last full article. Without much further ado, here’s my

2011 Scouting Year in Review

ie. I Didn’t Realize You Can Fit All Of This Into One Year

January

Ozmoot, Surf Moot and Australia

Simply amazing. Adventure, and to do so with old and new friends alike is the definition of Scouting. To see two well run events by Rovers, for Rovers, was empowering and exciting. The stories and lessons learned will continue to serve me for years to come.

Trainer 2

The weekend after getting back from Australia was the first of three weekends to learn how to be a level 2 trainer. Lots to learn, and really helps to focus the teaching. Still have to go as a trainer to more courses in order to get my third bead. Should get that done in 2012.

February

Focus course

I had the pleasure of training a third Focus course in 6 months. The fellow trainers who came out to assist me really stepped it up, given that I was out of town for the month prior. Couldn’t have done it without them. Oh, and the participants were awesome too.

Rovent

Wow! What a totally amazing, excellent discovery!

Applied to be DCC-Communications

I wanted to make the next step, and applied for a Council position. While I ultimately did not get the position, the opportunity taught me a great deal that can be applied to so much in my future life. Funny how that happens with Scouting.
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Uniforms: The history lesson you need to understand where we stand today

It’s been a week since Scouts Canada unveiled its new uniforms, the first time in 20 years.  Well, ignoring the Circa and Bring on the Adventure.  Both campaigns that failed miserably.  Circa was supposed to bring a modern look to the movement in Canada, instead it just served as an distraction to a sinking ship that was Scouts Canada at the time.

Back in 2005, a document was sent out to all who had email address on file and would be interested in seeing where scouting should go in the next decade. Not the best system of getting feedback but it was a start.  Slowly we’ve seen the document turn into reality.

We’ve seen electronic training for new leaders come out, so there is less time spent away from home. That can be crucial for getting new parent leaders involved and interested beyond the time their child is in the movement, or even recruiting brand new people to Scouts Canada.

We’ve seen a website that is massively better then previous generations.

And we thought this was good web design? (scouts.ca around 1998)

Only slightly better. (scouts.ca around 2004)

Part of that plan is to make camps more usable for scout groups, and I can attest to seeing the results.These sites aren’t only a place to camp, but are building up activities available there for minimal usage cost. Camp Byng for example now has a Frisbee disc golf course, an archery range, and a soon to be high ropes course, among other things. Plus we can make the camps useful for corporate retreats and such. Apparently having a group of adults learning how to work together to climb over a wall is teambuilding. Imagine that!

What I’m trying to get at is that changing the uniform is part of a multi-pronged offensive to get Canadians part of an organization where the core program can benefit all.  Getting rid of outdated ideas and misinformation in terms of getting rid of the stereotypes is part of the reason Scouts Canada is updating.

Let’s talk to Our Chief Scout.

BP on brownsea island, wearing a tie. This guy is classy, ALL the time! Also, not a Zombie.

When Scouting for Boys was published, it was assumed that boys would form troops within other organizations and wear the scout badge on that uniform in addition to the other groups various bits.  Obviously Scouting grew far too quickly for that to work and BP laid out his vision of uniform which was relatively cheap and easy to get.

Which it is now.

So let’s actually compare uniforms shall we?  Continue reading